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The Shuttleworth Aircraft Collection

1933 - Avro Tutor

1933 - Avro Tutor

1933 - Avro Tutor

The Tutor was designed as a replacement for the Avro 504 trainer. The prototype was fitted with the lower powered Armstrong-Siddeley Mongoose engine, but production aircraft were fitted with the Lynx engines. The Tutor entered service with the RAF in 1933 and from 1933-36, Tutors from the Central Flying School were famed for their impressive formation aerobatic displays. Tutors were also used throughout the RAF as elementary training aircraft. The Tutor was a luxurious and well-equipped aeroplane for its time, with a tailwheel, effective brakes, seats that could be adjusted for height and rudder pedals for distance, spacious cockpits and a variable incidence tailplane. The Tutor was mainly a military aeroplane and only nineteen appeared on the civil register. K3215 was civilianised as G-AHSA and is now the sole surviving Avro Tutor. It was built as part of the RAF's main production batch in 1933. It served with the RAF College at Cranwell and is painted in these colours today. It is believed to have been the last Tutor on RAF strength when struck off in December 1946. It was owned by John Neasham of Darlington & District Aero Club. It was later bought by Wing Commander Heywood, when unfortunately it suffered an engine crankshaft failure. After this it was purchased by the Collection and was restored to airworthy condition. K3215 is now the sole surviving example of the Avro Tutor worldwide. Height: 9ft 7in Length: 26ft 4.5in Wingspan: 34ft Engines: one 240hp Armstrong Siddley Lynx Max Speed: 122mph